Colorado is 46th in government spending on college, and costs for students are soaring

By Brian Eason, Associated Press

DENVER (AP) — In 2000, Colorado taxpayers footed 68 percent of the costs of a college degree, with students chipping in about one-third.

Two decades and two recessions later, that ratio has nearly flipped as state funding has been cut and tuition has steadily risen to replace it. Even after a 9 percent boost to higher education funding was secured this legislative session, top state budget writers don’t expect tuition to drop any time soon.


For 90 years, the Tower of Memories has watched over Denver’s suburbs — and on Sunday you can go inside

It is 167 feet tall. And it is home to thousands of dead people.

The Tower of Memories in Lakewood's Olinger Crown Hill Mortuary & Cemetery, seen from a distance. May 23, 2018. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; lakewood; cemetery; mausoleum;
The view south from Carr Street in Arvada. May 23, 2018. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

There’s a tower that looks over Denver’s western suburbs. You’ll be driving near Interstate 70, or walking in Arvada, and suddenly it’s there — watching you through a gap in the trees.

It’s not an office, not an apartment building. It stands alone on the ridge, a solitary outline against the silhouette of Pikes Peak. It is 158 feet tall. And it is home to thousands of people’s remains.


Surprise, Colorado: The guy who sold all those “NATIVE” stickers is a transplant

Eric Glade is a transplant, but that didn’t stop him from printing an estimated 1 million Colorado “NATIVE” bumper stickers.

"NATIVE" bumper stickers in inventor Eric Glade's scrapbook, May 24, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; colorado native;
“NATIVE” bumper stickers in zeitgeist-channeler Eric Glade’s scrapbook, May 24, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The idea that should have changed Eric Glade’s life arrived on the rear end of an automobile.


Economist: Denver’s home prices will rise faster than the national average in 2018 and 2019. Here’s why.

CoreLogic’s chief economist expects Denver homes to gain 7 percent in value in 2018 and 2019.

CoreLogic chief economist Frank Nothaft speaks before the city of Denver's 2018 housing summit on May 24 at the Hyatt Regency. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)
CoreLogic chief economist Frank Nothaft speaks before the city of Denver’s 2018 housing summit on May 24 at the Hyatt Regency. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

Millennials are getting older and mortgages are getting more expensive.


As the last assisted-living residents leave, Denver’s Golden Manor set for conversion to condominiums

The renovated units will be less expensive than other condos and town-homes in the area, which is near Sloan’s Lake.

"I love my place, this is my home," says Doris Wascher, who was homeless before moving into Golden Manor. "I thought this was going to be the last place I would have to move," she said. " I thought this is where I was gonna die." A meeting informing Golden Manor residents on details for the assisted living facility's closure in three months, Jan. 25, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) assited living; aging; affordable housing; housing; elder care; denver; denverite; west colfax; kevinjbeaty;
“I love my place, this is my home,” says Doris Wascher, who was homeless before moving into Golden Manor. ” I thought this is where I was gonna die.” Jan. 25, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

On Jan. 25, the residents of Golden Manor Assisted Living met one of the people who had bought their home.

At an emotional gathering in the wood-paneled dining room, they asked what would happen to them. Some are elderly, others have disabilities, and few were confident that they could easily find another home.