Denver school board pledges to ‘stand shoulder-to-shoulder’ with undocumented immigrants

“You have accomplices and luchadores in us,” said board member Angela Cobián.

Max Hernandez holds a little Puerto Rican flag at a rally held by high school students in Ruby Hill after a multi-school walk-out. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) protest; rally; march; students; ruby hill; trump; politics; election; kevinjbeaty; copolitics; denver; denverite; colorado; latino; hispanic;
Max Hernandez holds a little Puerto Rican flag at a rally held by high school students in Ruby Hill after a multi-school walk-out. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Melanie AsmarChalkbeat

The Denver school board took a stand Thursday in support of young undocumented immigrants, urging Congress to save the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and pledging to provide opportunities for Denver educators to teach students about immigrant rights.

“You have accomplices and luchadores in us,” said board member Angela Cobián.


Report: Districts can do more to give black and Hispanic students access to college courses

Young Aspiring Americans for Social and Political Activism gathered data about how many students of each race take concurrent enrollment classes in Aurora and Denver and is releasing a set of recommendations.

Aurora Central High students discuss the school's future in a leadership class. The high school is one of the state's lowest-performing schools. (Nicholas Garcia)
Aurora Central High students discuss the school’s future in a leadership class. The high school is one of the state’s lowest-performing schools. (Nicholas Garcia/Chalkbeat)

By Yesenia RoblesChalkbeat

School districts could do more to ensure students, particularly students of color, have an opportunity to take college classes while still in high school.

That’s the conclusion of a new report from a student advocacy group that looked at disparities in access to what is known as “concurrent enrollment” in Colorado schools.


Colorado teachers spend hundreds of dollars on their classrooms, union survey says

The teachers union advocates for the state to spend more on K-12 education.

First graders work on writing exercises at Goldrick Elementary School, Dec. 7, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; elementary school; education; goldrick elementary; learning; classroom;
First graders work on writing exercises at Goldrick Elementary School, Dec. 7, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Melanie Asmar, Chalkbeat

Colorado teachers spend an average of $656 of their own money on their students and classrooms each year, according to the state’s largest teachers union.

The Colorado Education Association reported surveying more than 2,000 of its members about their spending in 2017. The results were released Wednesday, several weeks into a legislative session in which state lawmakers are poised once again to debate how much money to spend on schools and how to remedy a teacher shortage that’s hitting rural districts especially hard.


Colorado’s superintendents want (a lot) more money for schools and a new way to divvy it up

Colorado’s superintendents want to change how the state distributes money to school districts — but only if voters are willing to approve a $1.7 billion tax increase for education.

District 50 Representative Dave Young. The first day of the Colorado state legislative session. Jan 11, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) legislature; copolitics; politics; legislative session; capitol; kevinjbeaty; denver; denverite; colorado;
District 50 Rep. Dave Young. The first day of the Colorado state legislative session. Jan 11, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Erica MeltzerChalkbeat

Colorado’s superintendents want to change how the state distributes money to school districts — but only if voters are willing to approve a $1.7 billion tax increase for education.


Colorado teachers spend hundreds on their classrooms because state won’t, union survey says

Colorado teachers spend an average of $656 of their own money on their students and classrooms each year, according to the state’s largest teachers union.

By Melanie AsmarChalkbeat

Colorado teachers spend an average of $656 of their own money on their students and classrooms each year, according to the state’s largest teachers union.

The Colorado Education Association reported surveying more than 2,000 of its members about their spending in 2017. The results were released Wednesday, several weeks into a legislative session in which state lawmakers are poised once again to debate how much money to spend on schools and how to remedy a teacher shortage that’s hitting rural districts especially hard.