WATCH: The giant M and a century-long Miners tradition

Colorado School of Mines freshmen have been adding stones to the M in an initiation tradition that spans more than a century.

The Colorado School of Mines M on Mt. Zion, Aug. 20, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) colorado school of mines; golden; lookout mountain; m climb; denverite; colorado; kevinjbeaty;
The Colorado School of Mines massive “M” on Mt. Zion, Aug. 20, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Ever notice that giant M planted on the mountainside above Golden? It stands for “Mines,” that is, the Colorado School of Mines. The college’s freshmen have been adding stones to the M every year in an initiation tradition that spans more than a century.


After six hours of debate, Jefferson County leaders accept money for affordable housing, other programs

This type of decision usually is a simple one, but this year it became a debate about whether enforcement of fair housing laws endangers the suburbs.

The Jefferson County Courthouse. (Rick Kempel/Wikimedia Commons/CC)
The Jefferson County Courthouse and Government Center. (Rick Kempel/Wikimedia Commons/CC)

Jefferson County’s elected officials talked and listened for roughly six hours on Tuesday before deciding to accept a $1.7 million grant for affordable housing and other programs.

This type of decision usually is a simple one. This year, it became an argument that drew the mayors of Lakewood, Wheat Ridge, Westminster, Golden and Edgewater, among many others, to the county headquarters on Tuesday morning.

It was the conclusion of a debate that has been brewing for months in the halls of county government. It was, at its simplest, a fight about whether Denver’s large suburban neighbor would break away from a long-running federal effort to make housing more fair and accessible for people with disabilities, racial minorities and others.

The county’s three commissioners ultimately voted unanimously to accept the federal money, with the requirement that the county will reassess the program and potentially try to wean itself off federal support in the years ahead.


Fear of “war on suburbs” may convince Jefferson County to reject $1.7 million for affordable housing, other programs

An opposition group argues that accepting federal money will mean Jefferson County will be forced to “gentrify” by building low-income housing.

Jefferson County’s three commissioners have a big decision to make on Tuesday: Will they accept $1.7 million from the federal government that could help ease the housing crisis?

Update: After hours of very interesting debate, they took the money.