An effort to preserve a Queen Anne in Denver’s Jefferson Park fails

A failed effort to landmark a Queen Anne home in Denver’s Jefferson Park over the owner’s objections could end up making it harder to carry out so-called “hostile designations” in the future.

The Denver City Council voted 7 to 4 Monday against giving landmark designation to the stately but deteriorating home on West 23rd Avenue. And council members not only voted no on the designation initiated by Councilman Rafael Espinoza but described a “broken process” that needs reform.


Denver City Council protects Krisana Park’s mid-mod homes

A mid-modern home on S. Edison Way in Virginia Village. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) virginia village; denver; residential real estate; houses; midmod; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
A mid-century modern home on South Edison Way in Denver’s Krisana Park. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The residents of Krisana Park really, really like their neighborhood’s Eichler-inspired mid-century modern homes.

“Don’t you love our homes?” is how Pamela Walsh described her new neighbors greeting her when she moved to Krisana Park in southeast Denver from California.

A conservation overlay unanimously adopted by the Denver City Council on Monday means those homes will largely maintain their character, including low-slung roofs, horizontal planes and no full second story.


Some Denver mid-century modern homes may be protected — Krisana Park could be just the beginning

The proposed conservation overlay would be the first to protect mid-century modern architecture in Denver and could be a model for other areas.

A mid-modern home on S. Edison Way in Virginia Village. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) virginia village; denver; residential real estate; houses; midmod; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
Krisana Park has almost 200 mid-century modern homes, like this one on on South Edison Way, built by a single builder. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

When Kate Adams moved Krisana Park in southeast Denver in 1975, the then-20-year-old homes didn’t seem particularly significant. While Adams appreciated the architecture, that wasn’t the main selling point.

“At the time, it was more affordable,” Adams said. “So many of the places in that price range were small and dark. And this had light, and I liked the architecture. They had a more spacious feel. I do appreciate now all the design and thought that went into these homes.”


Denver’s First Unitarian building becomes first Colorado site recognized for role in gay rights movement

On Monday evening, Denver City Council designated the nearly 115-year-old First Unitarian building a historic landmark.

First Unitarian building at 1400 N. Lafayette St in Denver. (Google Maps)
First Unitarian building at 1400 N. Lafayette St in Denver. (Google Maps)

The First Unitarian building in Denver’s Cheesman Park neighborhood became the first site in Colorado last night to be recognized for its importance in the history of the gay rights movement.