Trump tells Gardner the Justice Department won’t interfere with Colorado’s legal marijuana

Sen. Gardner announced that he had struck a deal with the Department of Justice to keep guidelines outlined in the Cole Memorandum in place.

The base photo in this illustration comes from Senator Cory Gardner speech at the Western Conservative Summit, July 21, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) western conservative summit; wcs; protest; cory gardner; marijuana; denver; denverite; kevinjbeaty; photoillustration;
The base photo in this illustration comes from Senator Cory Gardner speech at the Western Conservative Summit, July 21, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

When U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions revoked the Cole Memorandum, a memo outlining how the feds would govern marijuana in light of state’s legalization of weed, it caused some worries that President Donald Trump’s administration was about to crack down on Colorado’s legal weed industry.

Those worries should be largely alleviated — for now — after U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner announced Friday that he had struck a deal with the Department of Justice to keep guidelines outlined in the Cole Memorandum in place. The memorandum was revoked by Sessions in Jan. 4.


Sen. Gardner continues to block Justice Department appointments after sudden departure of top official

Gardner promised to prevent the confirmation of all Justice Department nominees after Sessions lifted Obama-era protections for states that have legalized marijuana.

Senator Cory Gardner speaks at the Western Conservative Summit, July 21, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) western conservative summit; wcs; protest; cory gardner; healthcare; adapt; medicaid; denver; denverite; kevinjbeaty; corygardner;
Senator Cory Gardner speaks at the Western Conservative Summit, July 21, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Sadie Gurman, Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The sudden departure of the Justice Department’s No. 3 official is adding to the turmoil at an agency that already lacks permanent, politically appointed leaders for many of its most important divisions.

Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand’s resignation builds on an unusual problem that has contributed to instability in the department, current and former officials say, and has prevented the Trump administration from fully implementing its agenda more than a year after Attorney General Jeff Sessions took office.

Sessions lamented situation Monday, blaming a single Republican senator for holding up the confirmations of key figures, including the heads of the department’s national security, criminal and civil rights divisions. While not mentioning him by name, Sessions left no doubt he was referring to Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado, who promised to prevent the confirmation of all Justice Department nominees after Sessions lifted Obama-era protections for states that have legalized marijuana.




No progress in meeting on pot between Gardner, Sessions

“Nobody changed their mind in today’s meeting.”

Senator Cory Gardner speaks at the Western Conservative Summit, July 21, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) western conservative summit; wcs; protest; cory gardner; healthcare; adapt; medicaid; denver; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
Senator Cory Gardner speaks at the Western Conservative Summit, July 21, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

There’s no progress reported in talks between Colorado’s Republican senator and the Republican Attorney General over marijuana policy.

Sen. Cory Gardner met with Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday. Last week Sessions removed Obama-era protections for states like Colorado with legalized marijuana. Gardner acted to prevent confirmation of all nominees to the Department of Justice unless Sessions reversed himself.