Colorado Reps. Coffman and DeGette team up to protect legal marijuana

The Aurora Republican the and Denver Democrat introduced the “Respect States and Citizens’ Rights Act of 2017” on Thursday.

U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman speaks to press before his first town hall meeting of the Trump administration, April 12, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) mike coffman; aurora; town hall meeting; copolitics; kevinjbeaty; denverite; colorado;

Colorado Reps. Mike Coffman and Diana DeGette are reaching across the aisle to try to allow states to set their own agenda on marijuana.

The Aurora Republican and the Denver Democrat introduced the “Respect States and Citizens’ Rights Act of 2017” on Thursday. Coffman and DeGette are introducing the bill at a time when the Trump Administration has been signaling its intention to challenge state marijuana laws.


Children’s Hospital Colorado sees four times more young people using marijuana since 2009

New research from a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Colorado casts doubt on whether more teens and young adults in the state are using marijuana.

Denver's latest cash crop. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) marijuana; pot; weed; denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
Denver’s latest cash crop. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

New research from Children’s Hospital Colorado calls into question just how marijuana use is changing among teens and young adults throughout the state.


Colorado Rep. Ed Perlmutter introduces bill to allow pot shops to bank

The move is part of the recently formed Cannabis Caucus’ efforts to increase protections for the legal marijuana industry.

US House Representative Ed Perlmutter (District 7) speaks out against Donald Trump on the State Capitol Steps on July 2, 2016. (Sara Hertwig/For Denverite) ed pearlmutter; denver; denverite; sara hertwig; colorado; poltics
Rep. Ed Perlmutter (District 7) speaks out against Donald Trump on the State Capitol Steps on July 2, 2016. (Sara Hertwig/For Denverite)

U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, an Arvada Democrat, is teaming up with representatives from Alaska and Washington this week for another push at getting marijuana-related businesses access to the federal banking system.



Denver’s 4/20 Rally is no longer the look that industry leaders want for the marijuana movement

Legalization split the cannabis community’s perception of Denver’s big 4/20 event.

A 2011 4/20 event in Civic Center in Denver. (Xuilla/Flickr)
Have men dressed as anthropomorphic pot leaves outlived their usefulness? From the 2011 4/20 event in Denver’s Civic Center Park. (Xuilla/Flickr)

Denver’s 4/20 rally used to have a political purpose. Out from the shadows for one day of the year, consumers lit up for the public to see, protesting state and federal rules banning marijuana use. Then in 2012, those rules changed. Voters passed Amendment 64 and turned marijuana policy from a mere movement to a full-fledged industry.

Legalization split the cannabis community’s perception of Denver’s big 4/20 event. Key people who in past years joined the rally in Civic Center Park are now involved in promoting the industry and have abandoned the annual event and even admonish its participants.