Denver City Council has a lot on its wish list for next year

It’s a rare occasion where the full elected body spends hours talking about what’s really important to them, and how they want the city to spend billions.

Councilwoman Mary Beth Susman marks her priority at a Denver City Council planning retreat on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)
Councilwoman Mary Beth Susman marks her priority at a Denver City Council planning retreat on Thursday, Jan. 16, 2018. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

The Denver City Council convened last week for absolutely one of the most exciting things to happen in the city: the budget planning retreat.

I’m not kidding. First of all, free coffee. Secondly, at least one council member did a handstand.

Third, and most importantly, it’s a rare occasion where the full elected body spends hours talking about what’s really important to them, and how they want the city to spend billions of dollars in 2019.

The top categories this year included housing and transportation, but council members also called for everything from a new police academy to an improved recycling program. I sat there all day to learn this, so you better well read it.


Here’s what dung beetles can tell us about Colorado’s past, present and future

Turns out, human impact has a lot to do with who’s eating Colorado poo.

Dr. Frank-Thorsten Krell inside the Denver Museum of Nature and Science's Zoology Collection deep below the institution's public halls, Jan. 10, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver museum of nature and science; dmns; science; biology; archival; denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
Dr. Frank-Thorsten Krell inside the Denver Museum of Nature and Science’s Zoology Collection, the futuristic vault of file cabinets deep below the institution’s public halls, Jan. 10, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

One of the world’s leading dung beetle experts calls Denver home. Meet Dr. Frank-Thorsten Krell, senior Curator of Entomology at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science who’s research focuses specifically on those charismatic little potty mouths.

On Wednesday evening, Krell will present at DMNS’ dung-themed Science Lounge, their event series for adults. Naturally, we were interested to see some of his collection up close and ask what his expertise might tell us about ourselves. As it turns out: Krell’s dung beetles say quite a bit about the humans around them.


Where’s Denver’s best coffee shop? Only four shops remain in our bracket!

Four Denver coffee shops remain: Corvus Coffee Roasters, Huckleberry Roasters, The Denver Bicycle Café and Crema Coffee. Which will make it to the last round?

(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)
(Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Here it is, Denver — the second-to-last round of the Mile High Coffee Quest.

We’ve been through three tense rounds of voting to get here. The matchups get closer with each passing round, and some favorites have fallen. But four Denver coffee shops remain: Corvus Coffee Roasters, Huckleberry Roasters, The Denver Bicycle Café and Crema Coffee.



LOOK: Denver’s Martin Luther King Jr Day Marade persisted despite freezing temperatures and snow

Over the years, the holiday and march has been an opportunity to comment on current events through the lens of Dr. King’s fight for civil rights.

Former Colorado Rep. Wilma Webb - who credited with establishing Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a state holiday - speaks before the marade leaves City Park, Jan. 15, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) mlk; martin luther king jr; marade; parade; march; denver; colorado; denverite; protest; city park;
Former State Rep. Wilma Webb – credited with establishing Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a state holiday – speaks before the Marade leaves City Park, Jan. 15, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Despite a temperature plunge that replaced a sunny Sunday with a freezing Monday morning, Denver’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Marade (part march, part parade) still proceeded from City Park to Civic Center Park with a crowd stretching at least a block long.