What happens now that the Senate Finance Committee has killed the transportation deal

Leadership in the House and Senate said lawmakers need to keep talking, while citizen groups may be bringing competing transportation measures to the ballot.

I-25 at rush hour, March 15, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; i25; I-25; highway; traffic;
This is just how it’s going to be. Get used to it. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

This was the deal that Colorado legislators and Gov. John Hickenlooper named as one of their top priorities for the 2017 session — a new funding source for roads and transit to start chipping away at the potholes and traffic jams that plague the state.

It died Tuesday evening in a 3-2 party line vote in the Senate Finance Committee. That means it won’t go to the Senate as a whole, where it may well have passed, and it won’t go to the voters in November.


Denver’s 2017 bond program could be as large as $900 million

The decision before city leaders now is whether it’s a good idea to max out the credit card, so to speak.

Kids cool off in the pool at Globeville's Argo Park. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) argo park; globeville; summer; pool; kids; kevinjbeaty; denver; denverite; colorado;
Maybe we can afford more of these. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The decision before city leaders now is whether it’s a good idea to max out the credit card, so to speak.

City leaders have been talking about a bond program somewhere between $500 million and $600 million, but thanks to significant increases in property valuations released Tuesday, they now believe the city could support a program between $800 million and $900 million without increasing the amount of the mill levy that goes to debt service.


Let’s take a closer look at Denver Public Library’s annual Lego contest

If nothing else, it brought an old-time blockhead back to the glory days of building spaceships that never ceased to thrill.

An aquarium in block form at the Bear Valley library, part of Denver Public Library's annual Lego contest. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) lego; denver public library; toys; kevinjbeaty; denver; colorado; denverite;
An aquarium in block form at the Bear Valley library, part of Denver Public Library’s annual Lego contest. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

For the sixth year in a row the Denver Public Library system has put on their annual Lego building contest on display, featuring works from kids and families from all over the city.

As a longtime Lego maniac, I thought it would be fun to take a well-lit look at this year’s entries.


The clock is ticking — and the appetizers ordered — in “The Hunger Games” of Denver public projects

Denver voters this year will decide whether to allow up to $600 million in debt spending on parks, roads and more.

A rendering shows a gangway running along the proposed RiNo Promenade. (Wenk Associates, city of Denver)
A rendering shows a gangway running along the proposed RiNo Promenade. (Wenk Associates/ City of Denver)

Denver voters this year will decide whether to allow up to $900 million in debt spending on parks, roads and more. First, though, the city has to decide where exactly the money would go — and it’s basically “The Hunger Games” of public projects: Many have entered and few will win.

Ahead of this fall’s vote, we’ve seen waves of publicity for big, flashy new proposals, from the River North Promenade to the remake of Paco Sanchez Park. There are literally hundreds of ideas competing for a limited amount of money, many with passionate and powerful supporters — and we’re now entering the most important phase of the winnowing.

With a big decision approaching, people are pushing for their projects. For example, the supporters of RiNo Promenade are hosting a big party this Friday. Usually, city budgeting processes don’t involve Blue Moon and appetizers.