Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, Sept. 25

Hi. I’ve been thinking lately that I need to spend more time east of Denver. Everyone’s always going to the mountains. What would you include in a plains roadtrip besides Pawnee National Grassland? Let me know, and then read today’s local news roundup.

Harry Hoffman's liquor store at Curtis and 18th streets, circa 1950s. (Burnis McCloud/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Harry Hoffman’s liquor store at Curtis and 18th streets, circa 1950s. (Burnis McCloud/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Legal representation is key for Denver residents facing eviction, study says, and most don’t have it

It’s a high-stakes process that can leave people without a home, plus an eviction record that will follow them for years.

Last year, more than 8,000 Denver households faced eviction notices, according to research from the Colorado Center of Law and Policy. It’s a high-stakes process that can leave people without a home, plus an eviction record that will follow them for years.

Tenants who had legal representation that year avoided eviction 78.6 percent of the time. (Although even the eviction filing is public and can be detrimental to future housing.) That’s the good news.

The bad news is that there were only 11 of them. Six lived in Denver Housing Authority properties and five lived in private-market homes studied for this report. 




How the Denver Broncos lost to the Buffalo Bills, by the numbers

Trevor Siemian was bad. Jamaal Charles was … good? And 32 Broncos took a knee.

Trevor Siemian tossed two picks in Denver's Week 3 loss in Buffalo. (Mark Konezny/USA Today Sports)
Trevor Siemian tossed two picks in Denver’s Week 3 loss in Buffalo. (Mark Konezny/USA Today Sports)

The Denver Broncos looked vulnerable in a 26-16 loss to the Buffalo Bills on Sunday. After eking by the Chargers and then blasting the Cowboys at home, Denver struggled in its first road game of the season.


Denver-area Spanish-language movies range from independent film to “It” en español

The lines for tickets and palomitas (popcorn) move quickly here at Cinema Latino — the only theater in town dedicated to providing a true Latin American-style movie theater experience.

Cinema Latino in Auorora. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) movie theater; cinema; movies; kevinjbeaty; colorado; denverite; aurora; spanish language;
Cinema Latino in Aurora. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By Priscilla Blossom, Special to Denverite

Film brings people closer together, and for some of greater Denver’s Latino population, that can mean seeking out the places that screen films in Spanish, or ones that are dubbed or subtitled.

Given that 30 percent of Denver identifies as Hispanic and 1 in 10 of Colorado residents are immigrants themselves, popularizing Spanish language and Latino film here just makes sense. That said, the struggle to find such films is real. Occasionally, a theater (like the Sie Film Center) might show a popular, Spanish-language film. Something by Pedro Almodovar, perhaps. But sometimes people just want to watch what everyone else is watching. Like “Despicable Me 3” … but en español.