Denver news in 5 minutes: What you need to know today, June 27

Hi. It’s time to read the noise and separate signal from noise. Here’s what I found meaningful or interesting in my read of this morning’s Denver news. Today’s roundup includes Cory Gardner on health care, Jefferson County’s big debate about free money for affordable housing, a moose boom and a teacher shortage — plus, as usual, a historical photo.

Harry Hoffman's liquor store at Curtis and 18th streets, circa 1950s. (Burnis McCloud/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)
Harry Hoffman’s liquor store at Curtis and 18th streets, circa 1950s. (Burnis McCloud/Western History & Genealogy Dept./Denver Public Library)

Religious schools get another chance at state funding in Colorado

Two years ago, the Colorado Supreme Court struck down a program that allowed public money to indirectly fund religious schools in Douglas County. Now that program will get another look.

Inside the Colorado Supreme Court room at the Ralph L. Carr Judicial Center. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) colorado supreme court; justice; law; civic center; denver; kevinjbeaty;
Inside the Colorado Supreme Court room at the Ralph L. Carr Judicial Center. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Two years ago, the Colorado Supreme Court struck down a program that allowed public money to indirectly fund religious schools in Douglas County, the suburban area that includes Lone Tree and Castle Rock.

Now that program will get another look. The U.S. Supreme Court has ordered that the high Colorado court take up the case again, as the Associated Press reported.


Denver weather forecast for today, June 27: Entirely too hot

Good morning. Today’s high is about 97 degrees in Denver with slight winds. That should be the worst it gets all week. A red-flag fire warning is in effect for the mountain valleys due to dry conditions.

Tomorrow, the temperature drops to 88 degrees, and it should stay between the mid-80s and the low 90s through the weekend, with a slight chance of thunderstorms each afternoon.


Air pollution violations could cost Denver oil and gas company $10,000 a day

The air pollution contributed to ozone pollution along the Colorado Front Range, according to a civil complaint. Ozone can lead to smog.

DENVER — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state regulators are pursuing potentially steep fines of more than $100,000 a day against an oil and gas company for alleged air pollution violations at dozens of the company’s oil tanks in a Colorado oil field.

The EPA and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment accuse Denver-based DPC Energy, Inc., of failing to sufficiently limit air pollution at 86 oil tank sites in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The air pollution contributed to ozone pollution along the Colorado Front Range, according to a civil complaint the agencies filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Denver.

Ozone can lead to smog.



Today’s Denvergram

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