In Denver’s gentrifying neighborhoods, some middle-class parents are avoiding the school down the block

“I don’t want her to lose privilege, as weird as it is,” Hilbert said of his daughter.

By Melanie Asmar, Chalkbeat

Eagleton Elementary is a block and a half away from where Brian Hilbert lives with his wife and two young children in west Denver. It’s a largely Latino working-class neighborhood that is rapidly gentrifying, and Hilbert said he values the diversity of the area.

But when it came time for the family, who identify as white and middle-class, to choose a public preschool for their 3-year-old daughter, Hilbert said their first instinct was to look at schools in wealthier parts of the city, where the test scores are higher.

“I don’t want her to lose privilege, as weird as it is,” Hilbert said of his daughter. “My pre-parenthood politics, I hate the idea of saying, ‘I want my kid to be privileged.’ On the other hand, it’s hard to say, ‘I want my kid to be disadvantaged.’”


Denver just added a new form of transportation to its repertoire: dockless electric scooters from Lime

Lime's launches its dockless electric scooters parked outside of Mutiny Information Cafe, May 25, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; transportation; lime; south broadway; kevinjbeaty; scooters;
Lime’s launches its dockless electric scooters outside of Mutiny Information Cafe, May 25, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Lime, formerly known as LimeBike, is ready to enter a new vehicle into Denver’s ride-sharing world, the electric scooter.

The scooter, called the Lime-s, works like other Lime products and is unlocked with a phone app and equipped with a GPS tracker. This scooter will cost you $1 to unlock and then 15 cents per minute to ride.

Not only is Lime excited to bring this product to the Denver market, the company believes this will be another step in getting the city away from car-centric modes of transportation.


Colorado is 46th in government spending on college, and costs for students are soaring

By Brian Eason, Associated Press

DENVER (AP) — In 2000, Colorado taxpayers footed 68 percent of the costs of a college degree, with students chipping in about one-third.

Two decades and two recessions later, that ratio has nearly flipped as state funding has been cut and tuition has steadily risen to replace it. Even after a 9 percent boost to higher education funding was secured this legislative session, top state budget writers don’t expect tuition to drop any time soon.


For 90 years, the Tower of Memories has watched over Denver’s suburbs — and on Sunday you can go inside

It is 167 feet tall. And it is home to thousands of dead people.

The Tower of Memories in Lakewood's Olinger Crown Hill Mortuary & Cemetery, seen from a distance. May 23, 2018. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; lakewood; cemetery; mausoleum;
The view south from Carr Street in Arvada. May 23, 2018. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

There’s a tower that looks over Denver’s western suburbs. You’ll be driving near Interstate 70, or walking in Arvada, and suddenly it’s there — watching you through a gap in the trees.

It’s not an office, not an apartment building. It stands alone on the ridge, a solitary outline against the silhouette of Pikes Peak. It is 158 feet tall. And it is home to thousands of people’s remains.


Denver approves more schools that will wait ‘on the shelf’ to open, despite pushback

In a split vote, the Denver school board last week approved three more middle schools — but none will open right away.

By Melanie Asmar, Chalkbeat

In a split vote, the Denver school board last week approved three more middle schools — but none will open right away.

Though they are modeled after successful existing schools, and though district officials feel an urgency to improve school quality districtwide, the three will wait with more than 20 others until a school building becomes available.

That could happen if the district closes a struggling school or builds a brand new one. But slowing enrollment growth means it will likely not build many schools in the coming years.


Trail Ridge Road opens for the season, just in time for Memorial Day weekend

Because of melting snow, conditions could be icy.

Above Rainbow Curve on Trail Ridge Road on April 27. (Courtesy of RMNP)
Above Rainbow Curve on Trail Ridge Road on April 27. (Courtesy of RMNP)

Just a few days after CDOT announced Mt. Evans Highway would open for Memorial Day weekend, Rocky Mountain National Park has opened Trail Ridge Road.

Now you have two great options for very-high-elevation driving that will make your visiting friends and family nervous.

Why are you doing this to them?

(Just kidding. It’s beautiful and accessible wilderness!)