Is it really a family event when tickets cost $250? and other questions Denver City Council has about the Overland Music Festival

Superfly wants to put a three-day music festival on Overland Golf Course. Skeptics ask, “Would you want this in your neighborhood?” and some say, “Yes!”

Opponents of putting a major three-day music festival on Overland Golf Course fear the contract before Denver City Council is a “done deal,” but at the very least, it does not seem headed for unanimous approval.



Denver is “maxing out” its credit card with 2017 GO Bond, and housing didn’t make the cut

Denver City Council members still want to squeeze in a few more projects. “I would recommend we do not push it any further,” the city’s CFO told them.

The $937 million bond package that Mayor Michael Hancock presented to Denver City Council earlier this month represents the maximum that the city can safely and responsibly borrow without raising taxes, Chief Financial Officer Brendan Hanlon told the Denver City Council Monday.

“I would recommend we do not push it any further,” Hanlon said.

That means Denver City Council will have a hard time adding any additional projects and likely will have to find cuts somewhere in the package if they want more money for, say, sidewalks or libraries. 


Denver’s once-in-a-decade GO Bond transportation vision, explained

Which modes reign supreme in Denver’s 2017 GO Bond package? Here’s a breakdown of how biking, walking, pedestrian and vehicular interests fared.

A view of the Denver skyline from 38th and Blake on June 22, 2017. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite) rino; river north; light rail; freight; downtown; mountains; sunset
A view of the Denver skyline from 38th and Blake on June 22, 2017. (Andrew Kenney/Denverite)

By now, you’ve probably heard that roughly half of Denver’s $937 million, once-in-a-decade bond funds are earmarked for transportation projects. And if you’ve heard anything about Mayor Michael Hancock’s vision for the city, it’s probably that he’s working towards a multimodal city.

But which modes reign supreme in Denver’s vision for the transportation future? Here’s a breakdown of how biking, walking, pedestrian and vehicular interests fared in the transportation bond proposal.