The Colorado primary ballots are coming!

The Secretary of State’s office will begin sending out primary ballots on June 4.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams holds a press conference for the new UChooseCO campaign, which aims to inform unaffiliated voters that they can now participate in primary elections. April 3, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; copolitics; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
Secretary of State Wayne Williams holds a press conference for the new UChooseCO campaign, which aims to inform unaffiliated voters that they can now participate in primary elections. April 3, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Folks, keep an eye on your mailboxes: The ballots are coming.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams’s office said in a release Monday primary ballots will be mailed out starting on June 4, ahead of the primary on June 26.


Former Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter, Chauncey Billups join Regis University Board of Trustees

Regis University on Monday said former Gov. Bill Ritter, NBA All-Star Chauncey Billups and food sales and marketing agency leader Jamie S. Gronowski are joining the university’s Board of Trustees.

From left: Former NBA player Chauncey Billups, Former Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter and retired food sales industry leader Jamie S. Gronowski. Photo courtesy of Regis University.
From left: Former NBA player Chauncey Billups, retired food sales industry leader Jamie S. Gronowski and former Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter. Photo courtesy of Regis University.

Regis University on Monday said former Gov. Bill Ritter, NBA All-Star Chauncey Billups and food sales and marketing agency leader Jamie S. Gronowski are joining the university’s Board of Trustees.


The Denver school district is exploring the idea of creating its own police officers

The goal would actually be to end the “school-to-prison pipeline” that criminalizes students for misbehavior at school.

By Melanie AsmarChalkbeat 

School safety patrol officers in the Denver district would get the authority to arrest students and write tickets under an idea being explored by the district’s safety department.

The head of Denver Public Schools’ safety department says the goal would actually be to end the “school-to-prison pipeline” that criminalizes students for misbehavior at school.


Denver native Marshall Fogel has one of the most prolific baseball memorabilia collections, and you can see it now

Baseball bats on display in the "Play Ball!" exhibit at the History Colorado Center, April 24, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) history colorado; denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty;
Baseball bats loaned by Marshall Fogel on display inside “Play Ball!,” an exhibit at the History Colorado Center, April 24, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The year was 1989 and Marshall Fogel, lifelong Denver resident and local lawyer, was visiting Chicago when he wandered into a massive sports convention.

“God,” he said, “it was like walking in heaven.”

He picked up a few baseball items and, soon, his love affair with relics of the game had become more than a hobby.

In the years following, Fogel amassed a collection that’s become perhaps the most complete (and valuable) in the country. Now, many of his prized photographs, tickets, bats and gloves are on display in the History Colorado Center’s exhibit “Play Ball!” It celebrates the history of the game in honor of the Rockies’ 25th season.


Here’s why south Denver can’t have posh things: Freestanding ER crushes beer-garden dreams

The story of one piece of property illustrates one of the biggest challenges to reinventing places like Hampden Avenue or Colorado Boulevard.

Southmoor Park in Denver's Hampden South neighborhood, May 18, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; hampden south;
Southmoor Park in Denver’s Hampden South neighborhood, May 18, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

The people of south Denver are pretty fired up.

They turn out by the hundreds for community meetings, many of them demanding sidewalks, restaurants and other amenities that often are missing in older neighborhoods far from the city’s center.

This year, though, they took a blow — and the story of one piece of property illustrates some of the biggest challenges to reinventing places like Hampden Avenue or Colorado Boulevard.