Youth on Record gets a digital music computer lab thanks to Big Gigantic

The Boulder-based duo decided last year to donate all funds raised in the second half of 2017 by their foundation to building a digital music computer lab for the Denver nonprofit.

Levi Vigil makes a beat in Youth on Record's new digital music production lab in their Lincoln Park headquarters, May 23, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; youth on record; music; mariposa; lincoln park;
Levi Vigil makes a beat in Youth on Record’s new digital music production lab in their Lincoln Park headquarters, May 23, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Youth on Record just got a big boost in its mission to train and support the next generation of Colorado engineers, producers and musicians, courtesy of Big Gigantic.

The Boulder-based duo decided last year to donate all funds raised in the second half of 2017 by their A Big Gigantic Difference Foundation to building a digital music computer lab for the Denver nonprofit.

And at the lab’s unveiling Wednesday afternoon, Big Gigantic’s Dominic Lalli and Jeremy Salken were joined at Youth on Record by another big-name guest: U.S. Deputy Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Pam Patenaude.


As the last assisted-living residents leave, Denver’s Golden Manor set for conversion to condominiums

The renovated units will be less expensive than other condos and town-homes in the area, which is near Sloan’s Lake.

"I love my place, this is my home," says Doris Wascher, who was homeless before moving into Golden Manor. "I thought this was going to be the last place I would have to move," she said. " I thought this is where I was gonna die." A meeting informing Golden Manor residents on details for the assisted living facility's closure in three months, Jan. 25, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) assited living; aging; affordable housing; housing; elder care; denver; denverite; west colfax; kevinjbeaty;
“I love my place, this is my home,” says Doris Wascher, who was homeless before moving into Golden Manor. ” I thought this is where I was gonna die.” Jan. 25, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

On Jan. 25, the residents of Golden Manor Assisted Living met one of the people who had bought their home.

At an emotional gathering in the wood-paneled dining room, they asked what would happen to them. Some are elderly, others have disabilities, and few were confident that they could easily find another home.


Feels like this election season has been pretty lawsuit-y, but Wayne Williams says he’s seen lawsuit-ier

Colorado Secretary of State reviews this year’s petitioning process during a meeting of the Bipartisan Election Advisory Committee.

Secretary of State Wayne Williams holds a bipartisan election meeting, May 23, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; copolitics; voting; wayne williams;
Secretary of State Wayne Williams during the Bipartisan Election Advisory Meeting on May 23, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

Colorado’s Secretary of State’s office can boast a small victory during this year’s election cycle so far: Petitioning candidates were only involved in five lawsuits.


Who’s Next: Politics — 16 rising stars in the Denver area

We asked you to identify the rising political stars of the Denver area, and you delivered.

denverite event; graphic; who's next;

We asked you to identify the rising political stars of the Denver area, and you delivered.

After studying nominations from Denverite readers and sources, we’re thrilled to announce the first-ever class of Who’s Next: Politics, presented by Sewald Hanfling Public Affairs — and you can meet them at an event where we’ll recognize them on June 7 at the ART Hotel. Drinks, mingling and, yes, probably a little talk of politics.

The criteria for the list were simple: We were looking for people on their way up in politics, whether that’s in office, working on campaigns, working in activism, fundraising, lobbying — whatever. As long as they weren’t currently declared in a contested race, we’d consider them.

Here’s the impressive roster of local politicos you’ve helped us build.


It’s taking longer to answer 911 calls in Denver, so your phone bill could get bigger

Under a new proposal, the city would increase that surcharge on local cells and landlines from $0.70 to $1.20 per month.

A firetruck whizzes across Downing Street. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; five points; breaking; sirens; firetruck;
A firetruck whizzes across Downing Street. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

If you dial 911 today, the phone won’t be ringing very long:  The average call is answered within 7 seconds.

But the city expects its emergency responses to get slower and slower if nothing changes, according to Denver’s emergency planners.