Lying liars are lying: Colorado McDonald’s franchises not converting play areas into pot-smoking centers

The fast-food company said there is no truth to a report on social media.

An old-school McDonalds, Colfax and Kingston. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) colfax; neon; night; denver; colorado; kevinjbeaty; denverite;
An old-school McDonald’s, Colfax and Kingston. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

By  The Associated Press

McDonald’s PlayPlaces aren’t becoming pot places, not even in Colorado, the first state with legal recreational marijuana sales.

The fast-food company said there is no truth to a report on social media that 15 restaurants in the state have transformed or plan to transform play areas into pot-smoking centers.


Historic Rossonian building plans include a hotel, lounge and Chauncey Billups

After two decades of vacancy, Five Points’ historic Rossonian Hotel is being brought back to life.

Members of the Five Points community pack the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library as developers announce new plans for the Rossonian Hotel. April 16, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; denverite; five points; development; welton street; kevinjbeaty;
Members of the Five Points community pack a Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library floor as developers announce new plans for the Rossonian Hotel. April 16, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

After two decades of vacancy, Five Points’ historic Rossonian Hotel is being brought back to life.

And no, it’s not getting a new life for a new Denver. The Rossonian will be restored to its former glory as a hotel and lounge.



As Denver gets bigger, its days are getting longer

We’re living in a city open for business 20 hours a day. Could it be 24? Should it be?

Closing time in LoDo, March 12, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) nightlife; bars; denver; colorado; denverite; kevinjbeaty; lodo; downtown;
Closing time in LoDo, March 12, 2018. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

It’s 2 a.m. in LoDo.

For about 20 minutes, the sidewalks have become steadily more crowded with partiers — some happy, some angry, some stable, some stumbling. They’re lining up outside food trucks as drunk hunger, that special brand of hunger, rumbles in their stomachs. They’re walking in circles and craning their necks impatiently, trying to find the ride they’ve summoned among the mass of thoroughly gridlocked traffic.

In a 24-hour city, this scene doesn’t happen.