Instead of stealing workers from each other, Colorado and South Dakota want to partner

Gov. Dennis Daugaard was in Denver on Monday talking about the regional need to expand career opportunities for students, graduates and displaced workers.

Western Governors' Workforce Development Initiative Colorado Workshop at the Art Hotel in Denver, Colorado, Sept 18, 2017. (Ellen Jaskol/Western Governors' Association)
Western Governors’ Workforce Development Initiative Colorado Workshop at the Art Hotel in Denver, Colorado, Sept 18, 2017. (Ellen Jaskol/Western Governors’ Association)

The governor of South Dakota wants Colorado and other Western states to team up on tackling workforce shortages that could be keeping companies away and slowing economic growth.




Donna Lynne is running for governor, pledging to tackle “tough and complicated” problems

Colorado’s lieutenant governor has made it official: She’s running for governor.

Lieutenant Governor Donna Lynne announces her run for the Governor's seat outside of the First Baptist Church on Capitol Hill. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) donna lynne; copolitics; governors race; election; politics; denver; denverite; colorado; kevinjbeaty
Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne formally announces her run for the governor’s seat outside of the First Baptist Church on Capitol Hill. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

No one is more surprised than Donna Lynne that Donna Lynne is running for governor, Colorado’s current lieutenant governor and chief operating officer said as she formally kicked off her campaign Thursday morning.

When Gov. John Hickenlooper appointed her to serve as his second in command, he said he was looking for someone who wasn’t interested in succeeding him and would focus on the day-to-day workings of state government, not her own political ambitions. Lynne, who has Hickenlooper’s blessing, said she really only started thinking seriously about running in the last month.

“I’m the pragmatic person with more experience than any other candidate managing billions of dollars in budgets, managing large organizations like the state of Colorado, and I think that really matters,” she said. “I know policy, but I also know how to get things done.”


What Colorado lawmakers are saying about Trump’s decision to end DACA

Democrats condemned the decision, and U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman, a Republican, said he’ll push for a vote on the Bridge Act to buy Dreamers more time.

Governor John Hickenlooper speaks at a press conference on the possible repeal of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA, Sept. 1, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite) denver; colorado; undocumented; daca; dream act; immigration; kevinjbeaty; denverite;
Gov. John Hickenlooper speaks at a press conference on the possible repeal of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA, Sept. 1, 2017. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)

On Tuesday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced what the Trump administration had been telegraphing for weeks: The Department of Homeland Security will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA program. This program had allowed immigrants who were brought to the United States as children without proper authorization to get a reprieve from deportation and work legally, provided they finished high school and had no criminal record.

The “wind-down” for the program will take several months, and Congress could act. The Bridge Act, which would extend DACA protections for up to three years while Congress works on a long-term solution for people in this category, has already been introduced, with Republican Mike Coffman a sponsor in the House. Coffman on Tuesday filed a “discharge petition” to try to bring the bill to the floor.

And late in the afternoon, after initially saying he was consulting with colleagues on next steps, Republican U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner joined Democratic U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet in expressing support for the DREAM Act. The Denver Post reported on the decision.

But at a press conference Tuesday, a White House spokeswoman said repeatedly that President Donald Trump wants “responsible immigration reform” that includes funding for a wall, not a stand-alone “tweak.” That’s a much thornier problem for Congress and places DACA recipients at the center of a political tug-of-war. Sanders hedged on whether Trump would veto a stand-alone bill but said repeatedly the president wants a comprehensive package.

Democrats used words like “cruel” and “disgraceful” to describe Trump’s decision, while Colorado’s Republicans were divided between those who want to see Congress restore some protections for DACA recipients and those who applauded the end of a program they see as an unlawful amnesty.

Here’s what Colorado’s elected officials are saying in the wake of the announcement: